Nov 182015
 

ChoceurDark85CocoaYes, we all wish! 🙂 There is a study to see if chocolate can easy the effects of fatigue. Good news you do not have to wait for the results; you can try this yourself! 😉

Before I even read the article I went to Eriksgirl that they are doing a study of chocolate as a treatment for MS. In light of that I encouraged her to run some trials of chocolate on herself to see if it improves things for her. She was fully on board. What can you not fix with chocolate! 😉 As I walked away she was unwrapping some dark chocolate with a smile on her face (I guess it worked for her).

I proceeded to read the article and the key is the flavonoids. That is great for my wife and her “love” of Moser Roth 80% Dark. I detest dark chocolate, and I am pretty certain my peanut M&Ms do not contain significant amounts of flavonoids. I suppose we will have to run our own study here and pit Eriksgirl and Moser Roth vs and me with peanut M&Ms. My hypothesis is that there will be no losers. 😉

Apr 252015
 

There’s a nap for that.

Lately I have been battling fatigue well beyond what is normal, and what I can blame on the kids. I think it is just a normal sickness because Eriksgirl is suffering from it too (maybe it really is the kids 🙂 Kids are always bringing stuff home so hopefully that is all this is.

All that aside Eriksgirl may just be tired from the “sleep curse” she has had as long as I have known her. I asked her if someone put a http://www.atletipercaso.net/8105/storie-yolanda-gail-devers-la-volonta-oltre-la-malattia#voodoo spell on her and she did not know. As I was thinking way back to 1993 there was an incident for her where there was a lady that came into Grandy’s and Ike, the manager, insisted loudly, I was not there, “she is a witch!” I was told she had long nails, I think longer than Gail Devers (Ike probably never liked Gail Devers either). Maybe it was the witch and she cursed both of them! 😉

Jul 192014
 

A city girl from Denver learns the source of her chronic suffering…
and discovers that Lyme disease can strike anywhere

By Linda Warner, guest blogger

Let me start by saying that I am an overcomer of many things. I grew up in a very abusive alcoholic home, where my parents struggled to put food on the table. I left my home at 16 to enter an abusive relationship with my daughter’s father. I stayed in the relationship far too long, but knew it was not what God’s plan was for me. I put myself through school, even going on to get an MBA. I ended that relationship. But nothing has been more draining to overcome the Diagnosis of LYME. I know that God has given me the strength and the tools to overcome anything.

I am not sure when I got bitten by a tick. I experienced no bulls eye rash. What I did experience, seemingly from out of the blue, was bone-deep achiness and endless fatigue and anxiety. Psychiatrists diagnosed me with everything from PTSD to BiPolar. As a single parent, marathoner and hard driving, middle-aged sales rep for a major global pharmaceutical company, I told myself this was normal. After all, my work had me in and out of doctors’ waiting rooms all day long — of course I would be prone to picking up whatever the patients were bringing in. Plus, wasn’t this what all “women of a certain age” go through? One fall day in 1989, driving to a sales call, I literally fell asleep at the wheel. I awoke after colliding with a tow truck. While the truck driver was fine, I suffered a back injury and my body ached worse than ever.

The accident really scared me and served as a virtual “wake up” call to get help. Surrounded by doctors at my job, I had easy access to a wealth of professional advice and diagnoses. And everybody pretty much said the same thing: It was all stress and anxiety. Continue reading »

Nov 162011
 

I received an email recently asking my present condition, and whether I had MS and Lyme. The concern from the author was she had been treating Lyme with some degree of success and is now getting worse. I shared an experience of someone I know which seemed relevant. This other person had also been treated for Lyme, but had not gotten significantly better. He eventually went to Dr. Shoemaker and he recommended they test the house for mold; and it was discovered they had a very toxic form that needed to be fixed. While taking care of the mold, moving, and taking new medicine helped he was still having significant problems. At a future appointment Dr. Shoemaker suggested he go on a gluten free diet for a few months. During that time there was massive improvement. He continues to remains gluten free because any gluten causes sickness, fatigue, etc.  As a reminder to everyone to be wary of doctors offering advice and no solutions because he has been told by other doctors after the improvement off of the gluten products that he is not gluten intolerant but offered no other good solutions.

My point to the author of the email was not about gluten or the mold but that you can have more than one problem. If you are not getting better or are getting worse than you need to evaluate your treatment and maybe the diagnosis. Many things can cause fatigue and just because you have been diagnosed with Lyme, MS, etc. doesn’t mean something else isn’t causing the fatigue, etc.; on the other hand it could just be Lyme or MS. Be diligent and fight to be well.

 

Mar 102008
 

In Friday’s post I responded to a comment by “Anonymous” (Anonymous deleted the comment) with another comment questioning her knowledge of Lyme pathology. Following is part of her response (Anonymous deleted the full comment):

I know enough about Lyme. I have a close friend who claims to have “Chronic Lyme” but who I actually believe is probably suffering from either Munchausen Syndrome or hypochondria. The “dissenting research” to which you made reference has all been published by so-called “LLMDs”—the same people who stick patients on unending IV antibiotic regimens (in some cases killing them, after which, at autopsy, no sign whatsoever of Lyme Disease or coinfections is found) or prescribe quack treatments ranging from “magical lasers” (LMAO) to fad diets to herbs which, when scientifically tested, were shown to have no effect on people.

I don’t know Anonymous’ close friend so I certainly can’t speak to that specific situation. Either way I thought there are some things that can be discussed about this comment. On a side note Munchausen Syndrome and hypochondria are very different mental disorders that present very differently. Anonymous should consider looking over the DSM IV on those two issues; I’m sure the school library has a copy.

First, since Lyme was the point of comment, Lyme can be diagnosed clinically. Proceeding with antibiotic treatment with clinical signs is a reasonable course of action. Antibiotics do kill people, but that usually has more to do with an allergic reaction. An autopsy would not test for Lyme, but if the body was donated to a medical school that could be part of some research. There was no citation so nothing more to really comment on. As to the quack, or questionable treatments that certainly isn’t unique to Lyme. 😉 Certainly after many years of MVT I’m still having problems!

The bigger issue is the invisible nature of many problems. This invisibility issue affects many diseases; though MS and Lyme are noteworthy here. Anonymous’ comment about Munchausen Syndrome should hit home to many MS’ers who’ve heard the “but you look so good.” Taking a look again at the NMSS site: You can’t see fatigue, depression, cognitive issues, emotional issues, depression, headaches, burning, pain, numbness, itching, etc. Furthermore, there’s no test confirming you are having most of these problems; it is just your word. It appears that Anonymous is early in her MS journey, and maybe has not encountered the difficulty of symptoms that are unseen. Hopefully she will not have to. Regardless, I hope she did not slap the Munchausen Syndrome label on her friend for problems she could not see.

Mar 052008
 

It has been a while since I posted, and I wish it was all because things were going great and there was nothing to write about. I’ll blame some on the end of the year busy, but for 2008 there has been some relapse. This time with both vision and fatigue, but I’ll write about those in future posts. There has also been some good news, and progress which I will get to later.

Regardless, I am back, and fatigue willing, I will get caught up with my posts!

Oct 172007
 

and yes it really is that red.

The new LLMD prescribed 3000mcg of injectable B12 twice a week to help with the fatigue. I mentioned to him that I had been taking a B100 vitamin. He said that the B12 did not absorb well through the intestines; which I had heard before (but I figured it absorbed some, and it helped, so it was better than nothing, and no one was offing IM B12). Regardless, while I was tired of the fatigue I also was not looking forward to taking a new injection; and the Rebif was at least subcutaneous. An intramuscular injection, in my mind, equated to the tetanus shots that I used to get as a child, which would hurt for a long time. Eventually, I gave myself the injection and a few hours later felt massively better. Better than I have felt in a very long time. The injection also went very well; the first time. Unfortunately, the second time I did the injection it went badly, and I can only assume I did something wrong (at least I hope the tetanus shot pain is not normal). Maybe if I had gotten some B12/IM injection training I would be better (or had been taking Avonex ;-). I did take the second injection in the evening (last night), but today I am once again feeling great, and no nasty side-effects like the Provigil gives me.

Jan 312007
 

Another exacerbation. In addition to the fatigue I have been having some balance issues, some pain in my arm (low level, burning pain; and only from a light touch), and an increase/resurgence of my tremor. On a side note, this type of pain is the most common type of exacerbation that I have, and typically affects the arms or legs. Recently, I also went through a period of sleeping very lightly; which certainly didn’t help the fatigue. And probably related, it seems like I have bounced from one infection to another for a while, and maybe that is why I am in yet another exacerbation. Of course, and for the first time, the antibiotics have given me an horrible case of thrush (and how can we forget the case of my MS was “cured” by getting rid of the Candida). So now on top of not being able to drink caffeine I really need to quit drinking sugary beverages (A&W Root beer) since the Nystatin anti-fungal liquid (for 7 days [and it tastes awful], and hopefully I didn’t just do in my liver with that and Rebif) is having trouble getting it under control; and since I don’t care that much for plain water that means aspartame sweetened Kool-Aid (and that probably isn’t good for the MS either ;-).

Jan 302007
 

I have now been suffering from fairly significant MS fatigue for a couple of weeks now. It seems to be slowly getting better within the last couple of days – especially this weekend. I tried taking Provigil for a couple of days last week, thinking the side effects were a thing of the past, but by day three I was highly agitated. I had run out of B100 a while ago, but refilling that has helped a little bit (though far from 100% – even with 2 B100’s a day).

Jan 172007
 

In response to Gwen’s post my exacerbation pre-dated the holidays. I am just a little slow to get to posting about the exacerbation, etc. (the exacerbation pre-dated Thanksgiving, and just being the 5 of us at home probably doesn’t count as holiday stress – just regular stress ;-). In fact the Solu-Medrol was completed weeks before Christmas. I also agree that many exacerbations just go away by themselves, most within a couple of days. This was not the case with the hands, and was the exact same track that led to the really bad exacerbation (from which there is residual damage). I did not want to risk any additional damage to the hands, and for the record I was recently re-tested and no carpel tunnel (nor any other tunnel problems in the arms) that would be causing residual problems.

Secondarily, does the cause of a significant exacerbation (holiday stress, etc.) matter other than for academic purposes. Regardless of the time of year, and surrounding circumstances I will treat hand problems aggressively. Conversely, pain, itching, balance, fatigue, dizziness/vertigo, numbness elsewhere, etc. will not be treated aggressively – and probably not treated at all (other than the normal routines). I think everyone needs to have thresholds with MS for exacerbations that are tolerable, and exacerbations that are not tolerable that will be treated aggressively. Some people may find walking problems to be more serious than I do, and treat those aggressively.

I’m curious, where do you work that you get 6 weeks of paid vacation (and are they hiring!)? (I get 4 weeks, but that is above average in my experience)